10 Questions Missionary Kids Would Love to Be Asked

10 Questions Missionary Kids Would Love to be Asked.jpg

Most MKs are asked hundreds of questions during their families’ home assignments. Ironically, many of us leave our passport countries feeling unknown. In all honesty, we usually don’t answer questions well. Our fumbling answers can create distance.  Many times we feel as though these questions are asked politely, without time or desire to listen to our answers. In order to avoid awkwardness or unintentional hurt, MKs can detach and dispel memorized responses.

This makes it difficult for those who truly want to connect. Have you ever longed to know an MK, but don’t know how to reach his or her heart?  Have you sensed that we struggle to respond to your questions, but don’t know what else to ask? As an MK, I’ve learned that certain questions can unlock the heart.

Here are ten questions MKs would love to be asked. There are two different types of questions for two different locations: church-lobby questions and coffee-shop questions.

CHURCH-LOBBY QUESTIONS

Ask these questions when you want make a friendly connection with an MK. Stop. Look the MK in the eye. And listen. Since we are asked so many questions, we usually gauge our response based on the question-asker’s body language.

 

Question #1 What is the funniest thing that has ever happened to you overseas?

Like most MKs, I’ve made enough cultural blunders to fill a book.  Most of these mess-ups include public bathing, getting lost, and/or eating unique cuisine during my family’s travels.

I love sharing these humorous memories. I can easily tell pieces of my story and describe my life as an MK. A side note: Prepare to laugh. (We tend to regularly embarrass ourselves cross-culturally.)

 

Question #2 What do you miss about your host country?

Continue reading here  at www.alifeoverseas.com


2 thoughts on “10 Questions Missionary Kids Would Love to Be Asked

  1. Truly a great article, I really love seeing other TCK’s / MK’s perspectives. I felt so isolated back in my days (80’s and 90’s) and hated the stupid questions people asked me…and their assumptions about me. I grew up mostly in Brazil btw, so you can imagine how many jungle comments I heard at 17. Your blog can definitely tell young TCK’s they aren’t alone! Good stuff. Keep it up.

    Like

  2. Taylor, you’ve written this with such honesty and care. It’s something we can use to pass along to sending churches to help them understand better how to care! I’m blessed by your choice to share your writing for the benefit of many others!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s